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Continuous Self-Improvement September 9, 2009

Posted by Hastak Shah in Personal Development.
2 comments

This is about me, Hastak Shah. The title is “The Ubiquitous Mind” – I like it, because I think it describes me well. My mind, or as a techie I would like to describe it as a quad-core processor, does a lot of thinking at the same time, can be in a lot of places simultaneously. Some might categorise it as an unstable mind – I don’t.

How much do you love yourself? How much do you know yourself? How much do you expect out of yourself? And many more such questions, I ask to myself. People say I think a lot. May be because I am not satisfied, not that with the things around me or things I possess, but with myself, my capabilities and my extremes.

I was just talking to my friend this afternoon and we discussed weird incidents that happen in life, different phases that life goes through and various challenges that we come across. He was of the vote that “I am very annoyed with life, nothing goes as I expect, nothing that I have wanted have I received in one go, etc.” First thing that came to my mind was a phrase, I had unknowingly learnt from somewhere, “Zarurat se zyada aur samay se pehle kisi ko kuch nahi mila”, which means “Nobody attains anything more than their needs, and nobody attains anything before its designated time”. I was once a very impatient mind, and impatience still trails in my mind, but to a minor extent. I have learnt to be content at least with my material needs and requirements.

But, I believe, the moment you start feeling content about yourself, your activities and your outputs, your personal growth stops. At the end of every single day I ask myself, What did you do today? Did it go as expected? Did you do anything wrong? Are you happy? Could you have done better? And I realised the necessity of this question from my subject on Control Engineering, where I first learnt about the Feed-back Loop.

Feedback Loop

Feedback Loop

Feedback loop is the system or condition of getting feedback from output or comparing the current output with the expected output. The difference more or less is adjusted next time to maintain a consistent required output. If there is no feedback, it’s called an open loop where you never realise what your output is, if it is even at par with the requirement or less or more.

A very simple example of this could be thinking about talking to my friend today, the points we discussed and the suggestions I gave to him. I would re-assess, should have I talked to him about this? Should have I suggested these things to him? Would it have been confronting for him or would he have understood and taken it seriously? If not, what is the other way I would talk to him, or help him through his situation and give more diplomatic suggestions?

You can even reassess yourself after a job interview that you would have appeared for, on a particular day. An interview is something I would consider more as a diplomatic discussion, or even a marketing session, where you are selling yourself and your skills. Before or after you know you were successful, you can think and go through the whole set of questions in your mind and confirm,

This is what can be called as KAIZEN a Japanese term meaning “Continuous Improvement”, a mode of continuous self-improvement. This is how person changes, and changes whether good or bad, depends on the perception he/she develops. This is how I have evolved to what I am now, compared to what I was say 7 years ago, while I was back in my hometown.

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